breastfeeding

Feeding A Toddler

Oh boy, oh boy!
So… it’s time to feed the boy.
He is very busy.
He has all this lovely space in his little cheekies to stuff food that he has yet to chew.
The High Chair is for BABIES not BOYS.
He wants olives on everything.

I had a hard time adjusting to the toddler diet.  My beautiful baby who ate and ate and ate and ate nice, nutritious, gloppy (easy) food disappeared one day and was replaced by a beautiful toddler who was on a grab & go mission where a sit-down meal was no longer on the menu.

He scarcely ate a thing.  I panicked.  I begged for help & got a few decent handouts that emphasized dairy (that he can’t eat), but since we’ve established that Milk Is EVIL and orange juice is eviler, I’ve been adjusting my recipes and almond milk works just fine.  He loves it too.  “Aaaaahhhhmon Mik.  Mmmmmmmm!”

I had to learn to put less on the plate, accept leftovers and just hope that he gets enough nutrition within the variety of foods presented to him.  And put out a bowl of snacks (cut up grapes, animal crackers, generic Cheerios, apple slices).

So, without further ado, I give you some before & after photos of my son’s lunches.  (More to come)

Meat and veggies

Here we have marinated venison, caramelized onions, black beans, steamed-to-death peas & carrots and toasty o’s.
As you can see, he really went to town on the peas & carrots, demolished the o’s, the beans are GONE and the rest is pushed into a mash of “I’m not eating that.”  Please note that I discovered steak sauce after this picture was taken & meat gets eaten now with lots of “mmmmmm” sounds.

tuna sandwich and veggies

Tuna fish sandwich, mushroom slices, apple jello (we use Knox gelatin and juice… I’m looking forward to trying the layered jello with almond milk – pretty sure it will work).  Green beans and tomato slices.
As you can see, most things got 1/2 eaten.

Please note that this is a 10″ dinner plate, I’m loosely covering the center with food in a single layer or very small pile and not all of this stayed on the plate.  I put some stuff back for the picture when he was done.  Now, at 15 months he doesn’t really drop that much off the plate, and yes, he eats off of the good china.  It took a couple of weeks to teach him not to bang the plates, but he doesn’t now. Do not expect your food art to survive first contact.

For some official guidelines, noodlesoup.com recommends the following for a day:
Breastmilk – on demand (3-4x daily <– OMG I want THAT kid!  Mine still nurses a bazillion times!  Boobs are funny BTW, just ask him)
3 oz of grains
1/2 slice of bread (1/2 oz)
1/2 c. dry cereal (1/2 oz)
1/2 c. cooked cereal (1/2 oz)
1/2 c. pasta (1 oz)
5 whole wheat crackers or saltines (1 oz)
1 cup of cooked veggies
1 cup of fruit
2 cups of milk/dairy (this will never happen in my house, they suggest orange juice with calcium, which also won’t happen because it gives him the runs and the burning butt… almond milk it is).
2 oz of meat/beans
2 T lean meat  (1 oz)
1/2 egg (1/2 oz)
1/4 c. cooked dry beans (1 oz)
1 T Peanut butter (1 oz. )  (nut butter in JR’s case)

If all of that is mind-boggling, a 1 yr old should hover around 900 calories per day.  But talk to their doctor just to be sure.

One thing my bonny boy does not do is hold his own cup.  Let me just tell you right now, DO NOT listen when the doc says “don’t let your baby hold their own bottle.”  Because you’ll be holding that blasted thing every time your toddler wants a drink.  I’m not even sure where to go with this.  The kid was breastfed so bottles were scarce around here, he drinks fine out of a glass or a sippy cup, just don’t ask him to hold it himself, he’s clueless.  I’m thinking maybe a bath time instruction session might help… not that I want him drinking bath water…

I try for a good mix of grains, protein, fruits & veggies.  What gets eaten, gets eaten… what doesn’t either gets fed to the dog, the cat or tossed.   I hope this helps someone out with “what do I feed my toddler?”

Temporary Bone Loss Makes a Stronger Mama

On a totally different note, I have a bit of bone loss from pregnancy & nursing. This is totally normal, and some recent studies have alleviated my worries about it being a permanent or bad thing. Not that I’d stop nursing him, but it’s comforting none the less.
Here is a link to the synopsis of the study:
https://www.bcm.edu/research/centers/childrens-nutrition-research-center/consumer/archives/remodel.htm

Much less boring & technical than the study itself, which I think is paid-only reading, and I’m cheap, so…